Getting Comfortable Being Uncomfortable

May 6, 2022

Black Enterprise Power of Women Summit

Getting comfortable being uncomfortable. Consider a time when you have felt like a fish out of water, stranded in a place where you couldn’t survive, much less belong. 

If you haven’t encountered a moment like that, you might be avoiding important opportunities to rise above, to shatter expectations and demand recognition for your accomplishments and contributions. This talk will inspire you to assess your approach to progress and embrace opportunities you may have long avoided.

Maybe you are a brown-skinned person staring across a sea of white faces. Maybe you are differently abled in a world that refuses to see your worth. Maybe you have the “wrong” background, pedigree, or parentage. Maybe you feel set apart by your core faith, your gender or your sexuality. 

To make advances in your career, you must beyond your comfort zone. You must get comfortable being uncomfortable, whether you are considering changing careers, asking for a raise, or pursuing a leadership role. Areva Martin shares moments from her education and career when confronting discomfort led her to excel and ultimately triumph. She reveals hard won tips and strategies that will prove essential to mapping your own unique journey to success.

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HUNDREDS OF BLACK AND MEXICAN FAMILIES FILE RACIAL REPARATIONS CLAIM AGAINST CITY OF PALMS SPRINGS

While promoting an image of Hollywood luxury in the 1950s and 1960s, the City of Palm Springs’ racially restrictive covenants prohibited Black people from sharing that good life or living in white neighborhoods. Instead, Black and Mexican Americans could only build homes in the Section 14 area of the Agua Caliente tribe’s reservation. Then, over a 10-year span from the late 1950s through the 1960s, Palm Springs hatched a plan to demolish Section 14 for the purposes of developing it into more lucrative commercial enterprises. To gain possession of this prime downtown real estate, the city hired contractors to bulldoze the privately-owned houses, often with personal property and belongings inside, and then the city sent the Palm Springs Fire Department to burn the destruction.  Black and Mexican residents were often forced to flee Section 14 with only what they could carry.

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