Find Post Election Inspiration by Channeling Your Inner Rosa Parks

November 10, 2016

I know that the election night results shook many of us to our core. They were certainly unexpected and shocking in ways almost too difficult to comprehend and describe. But despite the outcome, in my best “St. Louis survivor attitude,” I have already begun thinking and planning we both individually and collectively can continue the fight for justice on the issues we care so much about, including criminal justice reform, affordable healthcare, jobs and special needs kids and families.

It is this process of planning, collaborating and taking action that gives me HOPE! My efforts began in earnest yesterday on Bishop T.D. Jakes’ new daytime talk show.  He and I, along with my good friend civil rights lawyer Lisa Bloom, had a spirited, post-election conversation about the challenging issues facing us.  The show airs today.

The process continued with an intimate dinner with California political and community leaders where we discussed what a Trump presidency means for people of color, women and disenfranchised communities. This was an important first step in our individual and collective healing and a reminder that we are a resilient people.  If we channel our inner Rosa Parks, we won’t cower in the face of defeat, instead, we will stand tall, stand together and get to work!

I hope you join with friends and colleagues in your community to have similar discussions, and that you check out the #TDJakesShow today on ABC, NBC and on OWN this evening. We share some thoughts and opinions that I think will help you find your Rosa!

Rosa Parks: an introvert who changed the world.

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