Brave Enough: Fear as a Motivator

May 6, 2022

The Westchester United Way Annual Leadership Conference

Brave enough: fear as a motivator. Confronting fear is a natural part of growth, progress and transformation, whether you are working to make change in your career or your community.

Allowing fear to take the lead will hold you back. It will strip away your confidence, your power and your voice. Moving beyond fear, however, is empowering and exhilarating. In fact, the experience of confronting and overcoming fear is at the core of many individuals’ extraordinary success. This talk reveals why.

How do we make fear work to our advantage? We begin by reconnecting with the lessons that brought us to the moment and summoning the courage we’ve witnessed in our pasts. We succeed by silencing the critical voices that undermine our confidence, by putting our heads down and grinding out the work, and by becoming brave enough. 

Areva Martin shares deeply moving, personal anecdotes of fear and empowerment, and translates her own triumphs into lessons that will transform the way you understand and act in response to fear. You will leave with unique, practical and memorable strategies and tips will prove essential to your future success.

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While promoting an image of Hollywood luxury in the 1950s and 1960s, the City of Palm Springs’ racially restrictive covenants prohibited Black people from sharing that good life or living in white neighborhoods. Instead, Black and Mexican Americans could only build homes in the Section 14 area of the Agua Caliente tribe’s reservation. Then, over a 10-year span from the late 1950s through the 1960s, Palm Springs hatched a plan to demolish Section 14 for the purposes of developing it into more lucrative commercial enterprises. To gain possession of this prime downtown real estate, the city hired contractors to bulldoze the privately-owned houses, often with personal property and belongings inside, and then the city sent the Palm Springs Fire Department to burn the destruction.  Black and Mexican residents were often forced to flee Section 14 with only what they could carry.

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