Areva interviews, Nikole Hannah-Jones of THE 1619 PROJECT during the Leimart Park Village Book Fair

November 10, 2022

Areva Martin interviews Nikole Hannah-Jones The 1619 Project

During the 15th Anniversary of the Leimart Park Village Book Fair, Areva sat down with Nikole Hannah-Jones, Pulitzer Prize winning creator of The 1619 Project for an engaging discussion about the persistence of anti-Black racism and inequality in American life today. As a follow-up, the book THE 1619 PROJECT: A NEW ORIGIN STORY continues the conversation as a definitive account of how racism and Black resistance have shaped the nation.

Nikole has spent her career investigating racial inequality and injustice, and her reporting has earned her many, many awards including a MacArthur Fellowship, also known as the Genius grant, a Peabody Award, and as well as being named Journalist of the Year by the National Black Association of Journalist (NABJ). She was named one of the Most Influential People in 2021 by Time Magazine. Currently, Jones is the Knight Chair in Race and Journalism at Howard University, where she founded the Center for Journalism & Democracy.

Watch the full interview here.

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